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"[Historical ^ketc 



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HI'XTINGTON COI'XTY. 



INDIANA 



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IIIlKAl.Ii n;i.\ ll\(i (OMl'ANN. rKINlKRS. 

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«!., County '*";i'^. 



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'hK r>().\kl» oi' CorXlV C'i).MMISSin\KK 



20565? 



PR EFACE 



RKSOIA'TIOX HV CONOR KSS. 



Be it resolx'ed bx the Senate and Honse of Representatives of 
the United States of America, in Con^i^ress assent /ded. That it be, 
and is herel)y, recommended by the Senate and House of Rep- 
resentative.-, to the people of the several States that they assem- 
ble in their several counties or towns on tlie approaching 
Centennial Anniversary of our National Independence, and that 
they cause to have delivered on such day an historical sketch of 
said county or town from its formation, and that a copy of said 
sketch may be Mtd, in print or manuscript, in the Clerk's office 
of said county, and an additional copw in print or manuscript, 
be f\Wi\ in the office of the Librarian of Congress, to the intent 
that a complete record may thus be obtained of the progress of 
our institutions during the First Centennial of their existence. 

Approved, March i ;?, 1876. 



Preface. 



PROCI.A.MATION P,V THK PRKSIDKXT. 



\\'hcr(.'as a joint Resulution 'j'i the Senate aiid Honse nt 
Ivepresentatixes of the I'nited States was (hily apjjnned on the 
13th (lav of Mareh, last, which resolution is as follows: 

•• }>e it resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives 
of the United States, in Congress assembled, that it be, and i-^ 
hereb\-, recommended by the Senate and House of Representa- 
tives to the peoiile of the several States that they assemble in 
their se\"eral counties ox towns on the aj)i)roaching Centennial 
Anni\ersar\- of our National Independence, and that they cause 
to ha\e <leli\'ered on such dav an historical sketcli of said county 
or town tVom its formation, and that a copy (.)f said sketch may 
be filed, in print (.)r manuscript, in the Clerk's office of said 
countv, and an additional copv, in i)rint or manuscript, be liled 
in the office of tlie Librarian of Congress, to the intent that a 
complete record may thus be obtained of the progress of our 
institutions (luring the first Centennial of their existence." 

And whereas it is deemed i)roper that such recommendatioa 
be brought to the notice and knowledge of the people of tlie 
Cnited States : 

Now, therefore, I, riwsses S. (Jrant. i*resident of tlie Cnited 
States, do hereb)' declare and make known the s;\me, in the hope 
that the object of such resolution mav meet the appro\al of the 
people of the Cnited States, and that proi)cr steps n\a\- be taken 
to carr\' the same into effect. 

(ri\e)"i under mv hand at the Citv of Washington, the twent\ - 

fifth da\- of Mav. in the \'ear of our Lord one thousand 

[si'.Ai,.] eight hundred and seventy-six, and of the Independence 

of the Cnited .States the one hundredth. 

I'. S. (;R.VNI". 
I*>\- the President ; 

lI.vMii.ro.x Pisii, Secretar\- of State. 



Pnface. \ 

TROCLAM AI'ION \\\ VWV. (-,( )\'1:RN()R O]' INDIANA. 



TiiK Sr.xiK ()i- Indiana, ) 

I'lXl'.i I riN K I )ll' \K I .MKN r. \ 
'To tlic J\'opl(' i>t liitliiVia : 

It having;' b.'cn rcconiniciidcd hy tlic Senate and Hou^e of 
Representatives, in Conj^Mess asseiiiltleil, 1)\- a joint re.-iolution. 
approved Marcli i j;. 1S76, tliat the peo])Ie of tlie several States 
assenilile in their sexcral counties on the approaching^ Centennial 
.\nni\ersar\' ot' our National Independence and cause to have 
delivered on such da\' an historical sketch of said count\' from 
its formation, and that a c()])\- of the same, in print or mann- 
scri])t, he filed in the office of the Clerk of said conntw and that 
an additional co]n, in print or manu.-.c ript, be filed in the office 
of the Librarian of Congress to the intent that a com])lete 
record ma\' thus be obtained of the progress of our institutions 
during the hrst centennial of their existence ; and the President 
(if the United States, bv his ])ro( lamation of Ma\ 2^. 1S76. 
having added thereto his further recommendation of the same : 

r, Thcjmas A. Hendricks, Croxernor of the State of Indiana, 
do hcreb\' heartilv concur in said recommendation, and com- 
mend llie pro])er ol)ser\'ance of said occasion to the people of 
(Uir State. 

(iiven under my hand and the seal of the State, at the Cit\- of 
Indianai)olis, this 1st da\- of [nne, .\. I). 1S76, and of 
[sKAi,.] the State the 60th. 

THOMAS A. H1-;NI)K1CKS, 
]!e the (iovernor : Ciovernor of Indiana. 

Jno. v.. Nki i\ Secretary of State. 

Pursuant to the above Proclamatio:i, the Hoard of Commi>- 
sioners of Huntington Count), State of Indiana, appointed the 
following named citi/ens a Committee to make such preliminarx 
arrangements as may be necessar\- to compl\- with the above 
recommendation, \i/,. : John Roche. James R. Shu k. I,. P. 
iMilligan, H. li. Sayler and James Paldwin. 



Pirfacc. 
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE. 



To the Board of Coiintv CoDiinissioncrs : 

Your Committee to prepare an Historical Sketch of Hunting- 
ton County present to you the result of their labors. They are 
conscious of its many defects, but express the hoi)e that the facts 
narrated will 1)^ found to be interesting and valuable. 

They acknowledge their ol)ligations, for valuable assistance, 
to the following gentlemen : Capt. Jehu Swaidner, John Hackett 
and Josiah S. Grim, of Jackson Township; Jacob Stults, Samuel 
McCaughey and Joseph Wagner, of Clearcreek Townsiiip : 
Nehemiah Brown, J. H. Howenstine and Jolrn Stults, of Warren 
Township ; Samuel Copeland, Henry Kantz and F. M. Cole, of 
Dillas Township ; Thomas Roche, John Kenower and Sexton 
Emiey, of Huntington Township; John J. Anson, William O. 
Jones and James Thompson, of Union Township ; Dr. Joseph 
Scott, Jonathan Whitelock and John J. Scotten, of Rockcreek 
Township; George Buzzard, David Heiney and Enos Boyd, of 
Lancaster Township ; John C. Hart, M. McFarland and Charles 
E. Satterthwaite, of Polk Townshij;; Creorge W. Leverton, 
Thomas Fisher aud John Ruggles, of Wayne Townshi)) ; Oliver 
W. Sanger, Samuel Marshall and Peter Wire, of Jefferson Town- 
ship; Samuel H. Swaim, Leander Morrison and Robert Sprowl, 
of Salamony Township ; the Treasurer and Clerk of the City of 
Huntington; the County Officers, and particularly William G. 
Bratton, Deputy Auditor, and Willis A. Jones, Deputy Clerk, 
whose assistance was peculiarly valuable. 

John R(_)CHE, 
' James R. Slack, 

L. P. MiLLIOAN, 

H. B. Savi.kr, 
Jas. Baldwin, 

Cominiftff. 



INDEX. 



Agricultural Implements. Value of 40 

Agricultural Societ\ 33 

Jiirths, First in the County 2 

IJuikling Stone 3<S 

Cattle, Number of 4° 

Churt lies and Chun h I'rojKrt)' -;o 

Circuit Court, First Term ^ ,^ 

City of Huntington . . . . • 30 

Clearcreek Township 13 

Corn, Number of Bushels 40 

Coroner's Jury, First in the Coimty 4 

County Commissioners, First Hoard .... 3 

Counts' Offuers 5 

l)allas '{"ownshij) 16 

Deaths. l'"irst in the County 2 

Election, First in the County 3 

Flourinji Mill, l'"irst in the Count\ 2 



viii. Index. 

PACE 

(irand Jury, First in the County. 4 

Hogs, Number of 4° 

Horses, Number of. 4° 

Huntington 'rownshij) i^ 

Improved Lands 39 

Jackson Township. . 12 

Jefferson Township 26 

Lancaster Townsliip 22 

Lands and Improvements, Vahie of 39 

Live Stock, Value of 40 



"? 'y 



Manufacturing Interest:; of City c^f Huntington .... 

Manufacturing Interests of County. 41 

Marriage, First in the County I . . . 2 



Organization of the Countv. 



v> 



Petit Jury, First in the Countv 4 

Polk Township 24 

Population :^9 

Potatoes, Number m Bushels 40 

Public Improvements 39 

Rockcreek Tow.isliip 21 

Salamonv Townslii]) 2'^ 

Saw-mill, First in the Countv 2 

School, First in the Countv . 3 

Schools, School Ciiildren and Scliool Re\'enue 40 

Settlement, l''irst of the Countv i 

Shee]), Number of 40 

Slaughtered .\niirials, \'alue of 40 



Jiiilrx. ix. 

i'A<.i: 

Taxahlcs, \'aluc of 4° 

Territorial Limits of Uniitini^ton County i 

I'nion Towiishii) 20 

Warren 'rownshij) 15 

Wavnc 'I'ownshi]) 25 

Wheat. Nuniher of IJushel.. 40 

Woodworth, A. 1)., J""irst Settler of the ("onnty i 



HISTORICAL SKETCH 



■OF 



Huntington County, 



INDIANA 



The present territory of Huntington county, Indiana, is em- 
braced within Townships 26, 27, 28 and 29 north, and four miles 
of range eight and ranges nine and ten east of the second princi- 
])al meridian ; it being three hundred and eighty-four scjuare 
miles in extent. 

It was first settled about the middle of August, 1828, by Ar- 
temus I). Woodworth, on section fourteen, in Dallas townshijj. 
Soon afterwards, certainly not later than very early in 1830, 
Cajjtain Elias Murray settled at the "Bluffs," near W'oodworth's. 
Ill 1831, Joel Helvey and Champion Helvey settled on apart of 
tlie |)lat of the city of Huntington. In 1S32, .\lbert Draper, a 
)(nn:g man from Vermont, settled in Rockcreek townshij), near 
the mouth of Rock Creek. In 1833, the first settlement was 
made on the Salamony River, Samuel Jones being the finst set- 
tler. In 1S34, considerable settlements were made in different 
l)arts of the county, but emigration was slow until 1841, from 
which time the substantial development of the county dates. 

A 



2 Historical Sketch of ^ 

Marcia Murray was the first white child born within the pres- 
ent limits of the county, that event occurring at the " Bluffs," 
in Dallas township, early in 1830. She was a daughter of Cap- 
tain Elias and Henrietta Murray. Bridget Kennedy, a daughter 
of Michael and Mary Kennedy, was born in Huntington on the 
nth day of March, 1834. Her mother, now Mrs. Sexton, still 
survives, and resides in the city of Huntington. Mary Jane 
McGrew, daughter of Noah and Elizabeth McGrew was born in 
Salamony township on the 5th day of April, 1834. 

The first wedding in the county was that of Champion Hel- 
vey to Mary Barrett, which occurred in May, 1834, and was 
solemnized by Judge Everetts. In the fall of 1835, Jo^"'!"' E. 
George and Ann M. Murray were married. On the 26th day of 
February, 1835, Leander Morrison and Matilda Jones were mar- 
ried in Salamony township. During the same year, Albert Dra- 
per and Rachael Sparks were married in Rockcreek township ; 
•Joseph Chesebro and Susan C. Woodworth were married in 

Dallas township, and Johnson and Sarah Keller, a 

daughter of Judge Keller, were married in Huntington town- 
ship. 

The first death of a white settler was that of the wife of 
AVilliam Delvin, of Huntington township, which occurred in 
1832 or 1833. 

The United States erected, on Rock Creek, in Rockcreek 
township, in 1832, the first saw-mill in the county, for the use 
of the Miami Indians ; and in 1835 a grist mill was built near 
the saw-mill by the Government, for the same purpose. In 1834, 
Daniel Johnson built a saw-mill one mile east of the city of 
Huntington. During the year 1835, Ao"!" mills were erected by 
Fleming Mitchell on the Salamony River, near AVarren, and by 
AVilliam G. Johnson, on Cherry street, in the then town of 
Huntington. 



Hiin/in_i:;io)i County, Indiana. 3 

John Mcdrew taught the first schjol in the county, about one 
mile below the town of Warren, on the Salamony River, in the 
year 1834. About the same time William Delvin taught a school 
in the town of Huntington, in a house a little west of the 
"American House." 

Huntington county was organized on the 5th day of May, 
1834, and then com))rised the territory now embraced in Hunt- 
ington, Wabash and Whitley counties. John Burke, Stearns 
Fislier and Lewis Rogers were the first County Commissioners ; 
Champion Helvey was the first Sheriff; William S. Kdsall was 
the first Clerk; Captain Elias Murray was the first County 
Treasurer, and Amos Harris was the first County Assessor. At 
that time the territory included in the present limits of this 
county was known as Huntington township. 

The first term of the Circuit Court began on the 5th day of 
May, 1834, and was held by Ciustavus A. Everetts, President 
Judge, and Jonathan Keller and Murdoch McLean, Associate 
Judges. 

The present limits of the county were fixed early in 1835. 

The first election was held at the house of Jonathan Keller, 
on the first Monday in June, 1834, to elect two Justices of the 
Peace for Huntington townshij). The next election was held in 
.Vugust of the same year. One hundred and forty-seven votes 
were polled at that election in the then Huntirgton township. 
Of those who voted at that time, Samuel Moore and Patri( k 
Johnson are the only ones who still resitle in the present limits 
of Huntington township. 

At the second meeting of the Board of County Commission- 
ers, on the 23th day of August, 1834, Charles G. Vorhees was 
appointed County Agent. At the same meeting the letting of a 
" public jail " was ordered to be advertised ; and .\mos Harris 
was allowed fifteen dollars for assessing the county. 



4 Hisforical Sketch of 

The first Coroner's jury was called to sit on the body of 
Thomas Riley, and was composed of the following persons : 
Jerry Todhunt^^r, Champion Helvey, Obediah Ward, William 
Walker, Solomon Stout, Benjamin Sams, A. C. Evans, Paul 
Burk, Henry Drum, T. J. Lewis, Garrett Buckingham and Rob- 
ert Wilson. 

In 1835, Captain Elias Murray, County Treasurer, was allowed 
four dollars and fifty-one cents for collecting the taxes for the 
preceding year. 

William Delvin was appointed County Collector for the year 

1835- 

The first Grand Jury sat in August, 1835, and was composed 
of the following persons: Elias Murray, Joel Grover, John F. 
Merrill, John Burk, Paul Burk, Thomas Brackenridge, George 
A. Fate, Obediah Ward, John Thompson, Channing Madison, 
Edwin Madison, William Delvin, Richard Adams, John Emley, 
James Delvin, Obediah Brown, Samuel Jones and Louis Purvi- 
ance. , 

The Petit Jury for the same term of Court was composed of 
the following persons : Jeremiah Barcus, AVilliam Walker, Sr. , 
Champion Helvey, Joel Helvey, Jesse Griffith, Henry Miller, 
Eden Brown, Patrick Johnson, Hugh McCowen, Hugh O'Neal, 
Daniel Johnson, John E. George, David Kite, Albert Draper, 
Alexander McLane, Joseph Watson, I/Cvi Turner, Stephen Chap- 
man, Simon Cochrane, Edward Wall, Harrison Wall, Harrison 
Warner, James Gilleece, Thomas Delvin, Robert Wilson and 
George Turner. 

On the 5th day of May, 1835, the Board of Commissioners 
allowed W. G. Johnson seventy dollars in full for his services as 
Sheriff to that date. 

In February, 1838, Isaac N. Harlan AA'as allowed eight dollars 
for making out the assessment roll of 1S37. 



Htititiii^fon County, Indiana. 5 

In I83S, Charles W. Kwing was the President Judge of the 
Circuit Court, and Jonathan Keller and Murdock McLean were 
the Associate Judges. 

Samuel W. Hawley was County Treasurer in 1836 and a ))art 
of 1837. 

Joel Helvey was County Treasurer for part of 1S37 and 1838, 
and Henry Bowles was Treasurer in 1S39, 1S40 and 1S41. 

John Kurk, Paul liurk and John S. Merrill were the County 
Commissioners in 1834 and 1835. 

William S. Edsall was clerk in 1834, 1835 and 1836, and Isaac 
N. Harlan was Clerk in 1837 and 1838. 

Channing Madison, Rufus Adams and Peter Wire were County 
Commissioners in 1836. 

On the 15th day of May, 1837, a Board of Justices was 
elected, consisting of Jesse Clev'eland, John S. Merrill ami 
I^eander Morrison, who had charge of the county lousiness. 
They continued in office until in the next year, when Samuel 
Moore was elected as the successor of John S. Merrill. 

William Shearer was elected Clerk and R. H. Eddy was elected 
Sheriff. In 1839 and 1840, Henry Chase was Circuit Judge and 
Joseph Wiley, J. R. Enley and Nathan Fisher were the County 
Commissioners, which office had been re-established in the 
])lace of the Board of Justices. 

In 1841 and 1842 John W. \Vright was the Circuit Judge ; 
Nathan Fisher, Alward White and John Leyman were the County 
Commissioners ; Chelsea Crandall was elected Sheriff and Jo.seph 
Wiley was elected Clerk, to which office he was re-elected from 
time to time, until 1854. 

In 1843, J^""i^!^ ^- Borden was the Circuit Judge; Alward 
White, Samuel H. Purviance and John Leyman were the County 
Commissioners ; James R. Slack was elected Auditor, Chelsea 
Crandall, Sheriff, anil John Roche, Treasurer. James R. Sku k 
was the first Auditor of the county. 



6 Historical SketcJi of 

In 1844, the same persons were county officers as in 1843, ^-^" 
ccpt James C. Best, who was elected a County Commsssioner as 
the successor of Alwarcl White. 

In 1845. James W. Borden was Circuit Judge; James C. Best, 
James Taylor and Samuel H. Purviance were the County Com- 
missioners, James R. Slack, Auditor, John Buchanan, Sheriff, 
and Wilson B, Loughridge, Treasurer. 

In 1846, the same persons were county officers as in 1845, ^^" 
cept Nathan Fisher, who was elected a County Commissioner, as 
the successor of Samuel H. Purviance. 

In 1847-48-49 and '50, the same persons were county officers 
as in 1845, except Sheriff, Chelsea Crandall having been elected 
in 1846 to succeed John Buchanan ; and in 1848 John Buchanan 
was elected to succeed Chelsea Crandall, and was re-elected in 
1850, and the County Commissioners, who were as follows : In 
1847 and '48, James Taylor, Nathan Fisher and J. R. Emley ; in 
1849 ^"^ '5°' James Taylor, Albert Draper and Peter Emery. 

In 1851, E. A. McMahon was Circuit Judge, and continued 
until February, 1853. Peter Emery, John Heiney and Albert 
Draper were County Commissioners ; John Alexander, Auditor ; 
John Buchanan, Sheriff; and Samuel W. Hawley, Treasurer. 

In 1852 the same persons were county officers as in 1851, ex- 
cept Hugh Montgomery, who was elected County Commissioner 
as the successor of Albert Draper. 

In 1853, John U. Pettit was Circuit Judge, and continued 
until February, 1855. John Heiney, Hugh Montgomery and 
Sexton Emley were County Commissioners ; John Alexander, 
Auditor ; Samuel W. Hawley, Treasurer, and Henry Brown, 
Sheriff. 

In 1854, Hugh Montgomery, Sexton Emley and John Alex- 
ander, of Salamony township, were County Commissioners ; 
Marshall J. Purviance was elected Treasurer, and Samuel H. 



Huntin^lou County, Indiana. 7 

Piirviance, Clerk. Martin 1). Bramlt was elected Recorder; he 
was the first Recorder elected by the people. 

In 1855, John M. Wallace was Circuit Judge, and continued 
until March, 1S61 ; John Alexander was re-elected Auditor, and 
John Kenower was elected County Commissioner, as the suc- 
cessor of Hugh Montgomery. 

In 1856, Samuel McCaughey was elected Treasurer; James 
Taylor, County Commissioner, as the successor of John Alexan- 
der ; Jacob Young, Sheriff, and John Roche, County Surveyor. 

In 1857 the same persons were county officers as in 1856. 

In 1 85S, Joseph Wiley was elected (Herk ; Samuel McCaughey, 
Treasurer ; and Samuel Emley, County Commissioner. 

In 1859, John Carll was elected Auditor, and Enos Boyd 
County Commissioner. 

In 1S60, Oliver W. Sanger was elected Treasurer; Samuel 
Dougherty, Sheriff, and John Miller, County Commissioner. 

In 1861, Horace P. Biddle was Circuit Judge, and continued 
until September, 1869. William O. Jones was elected County 
Commissioner. 

In 1862, John Morgan was elected Clerk ; John D. Jones, 
Treasurer ; Frederick P. Lucas, Recorder ; Luther Cummings, 
Sheriff; Andrew Wiley and George Keefer, County Commis- 
sioners; and Thomas Bolinger, County Surveyor. 

In 1863, Martin B. Brandt was elected Auditor, and John 
Miller, County Commissioner. 

In 1864, Jacob Mishler was elected Treasurer; Luther Cum- 
mings, Sheriff; Samuel Emley, County Commissioner; and 
William C. Bratton, County Surveyor. 

In 1865, Enos Boyd was elected County Commissioner. 

In 1866, John Morgan was elected Clerk; Jacob Mishler, 
Treasurer; Charles Mayne, Sheriff; Frederick P. Lucas, Re- 
corder; and John Brubaker, County Commissioner. 



8 Historical Sketch of 

In 1867, Reuben C Ebersole was elected Auditor and Samuel 
Emley, County Commissioner. 

In 1868, Joseph W. Purviance was elected Treasurer ; Charles 
Mayne, Sheriff; and Martin W. Little, County Commissioner. 

In 1870, Thomas L. Lucas was elected Clerk : Robert Simon- 
ton, Auditor ; Joseph W. Purviance, Treasurer ; Aaron McKim- 
mey. Sheriff; Isaac K. Schlosser, Recorder; and Daniel Kitch, 
John W. Baker and Oliver H. Fisher, County Commissioners. 

In 1872, Sexton Emley was elected Treasurer ; Aaron McKim- 
mey, Sheriff; Daniel Kitch and John W. Baker, County Com- 
missioners, and James M. Hatfield, County Surveyor. 

In 1873, Jol'iJ'' U. Pettit was Circuit Judge one term, when 
James R. Slack was appointed, and is Circuit Judge at this date. 

In 1874, Thomas L. Lucas was elected Clerk ; Harvey C. 
Black, Auditor ; Sexton Emley, Treasurer ; Aden J. Wiles, 
Sheriff; Lewis J. Day, Recorder; James W. Gusman, Sur- 
veyor ; and Oliver H. Fisher, County Commissioner. 

In 1876, Daniel Christian was elected Treasurer ; Aden J. 
Wiles, Sheriff; James W. Gusman, Suryeyor ; and Joseph Wag- 
oner, George Buzzard and Henry Heaston, Commissioners. 

From 1844 to the present, the following persons have been 
Coroner of the county in the order named : David Myers, 
Isaac K. Schlosser, Joachim Fernandez, Luzon Warner, Joachim 
Fernandez, Tipton AUman and Granville Bocock. 

The office of Common Pleas Judge was established in 1S52. 
Wilson B. Loughridge was elected to that office in 1852, and 
re-elected in 1856, holding the office until i860, in which year 
Joseph Breckenridge was elected, and held the office until 1864. 
James W. Borden was elected in 1864, and continued in the 
office until 1867, when he resigned, and Robert S. Taylor was 
appointed to fill the vacancy and held the office until 1868, 
when David Studabaker was elected. He resigned in 1869, and 
Robert S. Taylor was again aj^pointed. In 1S70, William W. 



IFiintiii^to>t County, Iiniiaua. 9 

Carson was elected to fill the vacancy occasioned 1)\ the resigna- 
tion of David Studabaker, and held the office until 1872, when 
Samuel E. Sinclair was elected, and continued in offic e until the 
office was abolished in 1873. 

'The following named persons were either elec ted or ajiiioinled 
Prosecuting Attorney in the Circuit Court for the following 
times, to wit : 

Samuel C. Sample, March Term, 1835, to August Term, 1836. 

Joseph L. Jernegan, August Term, 1836. 

Thomas Johnson, March Term, 1837, to the Mart h Term, 
1839. 

John W. Wright, March Term, 1839, to the Mart h Term, 
1840. 

Lucinus P. Ferry, March Term, 1840, to the March Term, 
1S42. 

William H. Coombs, March Term, 1842, to the Sei)teml)er 
Term, 1843. 

Lysander C'. Jacoby, September Term, 1843, ^** '•'^'-' ^I^^'"* 'i 
Term, 1845. 

Elza A. McMahon, March Term, 1845, ^^^ ^^^^' March Term, 
1848. 

John S. Hendryx, March Term, 1848, to the September 
Term, 1849. 

John R. Coffroth, September Term, 1849, f*^ f'^^' A])ril Term, 
1851. 

Klza A. McMalion, April Term, 1851. 

Isaac DeLong, SejUember Term, 1851. 

Charles Case, March Term, 1852. 

James L. Worden, September Term, 1852. 

John M. Coombs, February Term, 1853. 

William Potter, August Term, 1853. 

Isaiah M. Harlan, February Term, 1854, to the February 
Term, 1855. 

B 



,o Historical Sketch of 

Lambdin P. MiUigan, February Term, 1855, to the February 
Term, 1856. 

Isaac DeI>ong, February Term, 1856. 

Oris Blake, August Term, 1856, to the August Term, 1857. 

Charles H. Parish, August Term, 1857, to the August Term. 

1858. 

Samuel Mahon, August Term, 1858. 

Richard P. DeHart, March Term, 1859, to the September 
Term, i860. 

Henry B. Sayler, September Term, i860. 

M. H. Kidd, March Term, 1861, to the February Term, 1862. 

Henry B. Sayler, February Term, 1862. 

Thomas C. Whiteside, February Term, 1863, to the August 
Term, 1864. 

Henry B. Sayler, August Term, 1864. 

Dudley H. Chase, April Term, 1865, to the April Term, 1866. 

Thomas Roche, April Term, 1866. 

James C. Branyan, October Term, 1866. 

C.eorge W. Stults, November Term, 1868. 

Joseph S. Daily, September Term, 1869, to the March Term, 

1873- 
Alexander Hess, March Term, 1873. 

William H. Carroll, June Term, 1873, to the December 
Term, 1873. 

Alfred Moore, December Term, 1873, ^'^ the present time. 

The following named i)ersons were either elected or a]>pointed 
Prosecuting Attorney in the Common Pleas Court for the follow- 
ing times, to wit : 

John R. Coffroth, November Term, 1852. 

Benedict Burns, April Term, 1853. 

T.ambdin P. Milligan, July Term, 1853. 

John R. Coffroth, October Term, 1853, to the July Term, 

1854. 



Hunlin\^ton County, Indiana. 1 1 

Isaac DeLong, July 'rerni, 1854, to the January Term, 1855. 

Lambdin P. Milligan, January Term, 1855, tt; the October 
'I'erm, 1855. 

WiUiam C. Kocher, (October Term, 1855, to the June Term, 
1856. 

John R. Coffroth, June Term, 1856, to tlie January Term, 

Samuel Mahon, January Term, 1857, to the June Term, 1859. 

Frederick P. Lucas, June Term, 1859, to March Term, i860. 

Newton Hurwell, March Term, i860, to the January 'I'erm, 
1861. 

David T. Smitli, January Term, 1861, to the February Term, 
1863. 

David Colerick, February Term, 1863, to the February Term, 
1867. 

Josej)h S. Daily, February Term, 1867, to the February Term, 
1869. 

Benjamin F. Ibach, February 'I'erm, 1869, to the Febrv'ar), 
Term, 1873. 

A. H. Bittenger, February Term, 1S73, which was the last 
Term of said Court, it having been abolished at that time by 
the Legislature. 

The office of County Kxaminer of Common Schools was 
create<l in 1865. Richard A. Curran was a])i)ointed to tliis 
office in June, 1865, and continued in office until June, 1871, 
when Morris L. Spencer was appointed. He resigned in March, 
1874, and in .\pril following, Francis M. Huff was appointed, 
and still continues in office. In 1873 ^'""^ designation of the 
office was changed, and is now known as " County Sujjerinten- 
<lent." 



Historical SkctcJi of 



JACKSON TOWNSHIP. 

Jackson Township was organized at the September term, 1S41, 
of the Board of County Commissioners. The first election was 
at the house of Samuel Gettis. Andrew Boggs was the Inspec- 
tor of the election. The township was first settled by Jared 
Darrow, who emigrated Avest with his family, consisting of four 
persons, from Rochester, New York, in the year 1837. He set- 
tled one mile south of the town of Roanoke. His nationality 
was American. 

Within the next year Messrs. Thompson, Southwick, Decker. 
R. L. Eskridge and Paul H. Salts settled in the townshii). 
Paul H. Salts is the only one of these pioneers left surviving. 

C'aptain Columbia built the first house in the townshijj, which 
was built at Roanoke, and the first log-rolling was on the land 
of Lemuel (i. Jones, near the lock at Roanoke. Lemuel J. 
Salts was the first white child born in the township. He was 
born in 1839. His parents were Paul H. and Lucy J. Salts. 

The first marriage was in 1838, Joseph Satel and Sarah Dar- 
row being the contracting parties. 

The first death in the townshij) was that of Francis Dupee, 
which occurred in 1841. 

In 1845, ^'- ^^- J<Ji"'^^ built the first saw-mill in the townshij) 
at Roanoke. He also, in 1847, built the first flouring mill, near 
the Lock, then known as Dickey's Lock. At this time there are 
eight saw-mills and one flouring mill in the township. 

The first school was kept at Wcsle\' Chapel, two miles north 
of Roan<.)ke, by William Allen. The first school-house was built 
at Wesley Chapel. Wesley Chapel was built in 1850 l)\- the 
Methodist church. It was the first cl.urih built in the town- 
shii). 



IItintiii:^ton Coiiiit\\ Indiana. 13 

()thcr (Icnominatiuns i)iiilt ( liurchcs in the following order: 
li'nited Brethren, at H.')an()ke ; Lutheran Church : I'nited Breth- 
ren, at Brandenburg's ; /,io!i L'nited P.rethren Church, on lUill 
Creek ; New Lutheran and Catholic. The leading denomina- 
tions are the United Brethren and Methodist. 

Roanoke is a considerable town, representing man\ of the 
industries, and inijjroving. it has a i)o])ulati(jn of about 1,000. 



CLK.\RCRKKK 'l( )WNSHir. 

Clearcreek Townshi]) was organized on the 24th day of i'"el)ru- 
ar\-, 1838. It was six miles wide, north and south, and sixteen 
miles long. The hr^t election was held on the first Monda\- in 
.Xpril. 1838, at the house of John R. Kmlew 'I'homas Delvin 
was the first township c lerk. 

The township was reduced iu September, 1841, b\ the organ- 
ization of Jackson township. It was again rediu ed, and to its 
l)resent limits, in Jime, 1843, b\ the organization of Warren 
township. 

The township was hrst settled b\ Michael I)o\!e, who located 
on the southeast ipiarter of section thirty-three, in the fall of 
1834. He built the first log cabin in the township, a portion of 
the ba( k wall of which still marks its site. The present owner 
of the jjremise-;, D.miel Kitch. has planted this year a Centen- 
nial trje where the '"old house" stood, to preserve the identity 
of its location. 

Michael Doyle had five persons in his famil\. His nationalitx 
was Irish. Within the next year John R. Kmle\ , with his wife 
and nine < hildren, settled on the northeast (|uarter of se( tion 
twent\-nine. Light of his < hildren still survi\e. 



14 Historical Slzetch of 

James McCambridge and his brother also settled in the town- 
ship late in 1834. 

The first log-rolling was on the farm of Thomas Delvin, in 
section thirty-three, in 1835. 

Elizabeth Miller was the first white child born in the town- 
ship. She was the danghter of Henry Miller, and was born in 
May, 1836. 

The first wedding occurred in November, 1841, Samuel 
Reams and Louisa Dial being the principal parties in the cere- 
mony. 

The first death was that of Wesley Emley, which occurred in 
October, 1836. 

In 1836, John R. iMiiley erected a corn mill, the first in " all 
that region." In 1843, Samuel C. Emley built the first saw- 
mill on section twenty-eight. .\t this time there are five saw- 
mills in ojieration in the township. 

Abraham Binkley " kept" the first school in the township, at 
Emley's school-house, which stood near the present site of Clear- 
creek Church, but which has long since disappeared. 

The first school -house was built in 1838, on the northeast 
(juarter of section twenty-nine, and was known a.s the Emley 
school -house. 

The first church was built in the centre of the township by 
the United Brethren. Denominations followed and organized 
in the following order : Christian, Evangelists, Methodist an<l 
Cerman Baptist. 

The German Baptist, United Brethren and Methodist are the 
leading denominations. 

Anthony Emley, in 1835, carried the second lot of flour ever 
used in the township on his shoulder from Huntington, in two 
loads of one hundred pounds each. 

The venerable Jacob Kitt, 96 years old, resides in this town- 
ship. He is probably the oldest man in the county. 



Huntiir^ion County, Indiana. 15 



WARRKN TOWNSHIP. 

Warren Township was organized at the June Term, 1843, ^♦'^ 
the Board of County Commissioners. The first election was 
held at the school-house near John .Altman's. Jacob Shull was 
the ins|)ector of the election. 

I'he townshij) was first settled in 1835 ^'X ('forge Zellers, who 
moved with his famil\', consisting of eight persons, from AN'ayne 
County, Ohio, to section eleven. His nationality was (Jerman. 

Within the next year, Thomas Staley and (ieorge Schlosser 
settled in the township, (leorge Schlosser sowed the first wheat 
ever .sowed in the townshij). 

The first log-rolling was on the farm of (leorge Zellers. 

M Staley, the child of Thomas and .\manda Stale\ , 

was the first white child born in the townshi]), which birth oc- 
curred in 1836. 

The first marriage was that of William Delvin and Susan 
Zjllers in 1837. 

The first death was that of a man named Noyer, who was 
killed by the falling of a tree in 1841. 

Joseph Miller built the first saw-mill in the township in 1856, 
on section twent\-two, and two years afterwards, on the same 
section, he erected the first flouring-mill. There are now four 
saw-mills and one shingle-mill in c)i)eration. 

In 1841, Joim W. Funk taught the first school on section 
eleven. The first school-house was built in 1841, on section 
eleven, at ".\ltman's Corners." 

In 1855 the Lutherans built the first church in the townshij). 
It was erected on sec tion twenty-one. Following the Lutherans, 
the Methodist, Ignited IJrethren, (ierman Ba|)tist. Second .\d- 
ventist and Disciple denominations organized in the order of 



1 6 Historical Sketch of 

time as above set out. The Lutherans ami United Brethren are 
the leading denominations in the township. 

Christian Daily, George France and John T. Cook were the 
first Trustees. William T. Gufifin was the first Township Clerk. 
James White was the first Township Treasiu'er. John Altman 
was the first Justice of the Peace, and John W. Funk was tlie 
first Constable. 



DALLAS TOWNSHIP. 

D-ilIa> Township was organized at the March 'I'erm, 1847, of 
the Board of County Commissioners. It was settled about the 
middle of August, 1828, by Artemus D. Woodworth, who with 
his fiimily, consisting of five persons, settled on the northwest 
(juarter of section fourteen. His nationality was American. 

Capt. Elias Murray settled near by Woodworth's not long 
afterwards, certainly as early as the winter of 1829-30. 

The first house was built, and the first log-rolling occurred on 
the farm of Artemus H. Woodworth. 

Marcia Murray, a daughter of Capt. Elias and Henrietta 
Murray was the first white child born in the township. The 
exact date of her birth is unknown, but it was early in 1830. 

On the iSth day of November, 1835, Joseph Cheesebro and 
Susan C. Woodworth were married. This was the first marriage 
in the township. 

Artemus D. Woodworth and William G. Campbell erected 
the first saw-mill. It was built in 1833, o" ^^'^^ wtf,^. branch of 
Silver Creek, about one and a half miles from its junction with 
Wabash River. There are now five saw-mills in the township. 



Hiinfi/ii:;f(>n County., Indiana. 17 

The first flouring-mill was l)uilt by Elijah Snowden, in 1862, 
in the town of Antioch. 

The first school was "kept" in iS44an(.l 1845. Hliz-ibeth 
H. Edwards was the first teacher. The school was taught in 
llie house erected in 1844 as a " Meeting-house " and school- 
house, on the southeast (juarter of section two, on a lot donated 
by John Moore to the Society of Friends for " Meeting-house 
and burial purposes." The house was used as a "Meeting- 
house" by the "Friends," and was tlie first house erected for 
church purposes in the township. Other churches were built in 
the following order: United Brethren, German Lutheran, 
Methodists, Christians and German Baptists. 

Antioch is the only town in tlie townsliip. It was laid out in 
1853, and contains a jjopulation of about five hundred. The 
original proprietor was .Abraham Leedy. .\dditions thereto 
have been platted by Jacob Wintrode, Doctor Campbell and 
IClijah Snowden. It has three churches, one fine brick school 
house, and various manufacturing and mercantile establishments, 
all indicating a prosperous and energetic population. 

John Moore, the founder of the "Friends' Meeting" in the 
township, was one of the early pioneers, and was principally in- 
strumental in securing the settlement of a considerable portion 
of the township by members of that Society at an early day. 
He was a native of North Carolina, and moved to Wayne coun- 
ty, Indiana, in 1S25, and from thence to this township in 1837. 
He died in 1872, aged nearly eighty-four years. 



iS Historical Sketch of 



HUNTINGTON TOWNSHIP. 

Huntington Township was first reduced by the organization of 
Salamony Township on the 24th day of February, 1835 ; next by 
by the organization of Lancaster Township on the 15th day of 
May, 1837; and next by the organization of Clearcreek Town- 
shij) on the 24th day of February, 18.38. These four townships 
were then each six miles wide, north and south, and sixteen 
miles long. Huntington Township was again reduced by the or- 
ganization of Monroe Township, (noAv called Union,) at the 
September term, 1842, of the Board of County Commissioners, 
and finally to its present limits by the organization of Dallas 
Township at the March term, 1847, ^^ the Board of County 
Commissioners. 

The first settlers o{ the present limits of the township were 
Joel Helvey and Champion Helvey, who came in 1831, and set- 
tled on a part of the present plat of the City of Huntington. 
They moved here from the Wabash River, opposite the mouth of 
the Salamony River. They were natives of Tennessee. 

The first house was built by the Helveys on the bank of Little 
River, near the mouth of Flint Creek, which was used as a tav- 
ern, and was known as Flint Springs Hotel. The first log-roll- 
ing was on what is known as the Chief's farm, at the forks of 
the \Val)ash River. 

Bridget Kennedy, a daughter of Michael and Mar)^ Kennedy, 
was the first white child born in the township. She was born on 
tlie nth day of March, 1834. 

The first marriage was that of Champion Helvey to Mary 
Barrett, which occurred in May, 1834, and was solemnized by 
Judge Everetts. John E. George and Ann M. Murray were 
married in the fall of 1834. Johnson and Sarah Keller, a 



Huntington County, Imiiana. 19 

dauhgter of Judge Keller, were married in 1835. In the spring 
of 1837 Samuel Moore and Mary A. Frtxtater were married. 
This is the first marriage in the county of which any iKihlic re- 
cord is found. 

The first death was that of the wife of William Djlvin. She 
died in 1832 or 1833. 

The first saw-mill was built in 1834 by Daniel Johnson, one 
mile east of the City of Huntington. There are now seven .saw- 
mills in operation in the township. 

In 1837 William G. Johnson built the first flouring-mill. It 
was erected on the south hank of Flint Creek, on Cherry street, 
in the (^ity of Huntington. There are now four flouring-mills 
in the township. 

The first school was kept in the house of Jonatlian Keller, a 
few feet west of the present site of the American House, in the 
City of Huntington, in the winter of 1834 and 1835, and was 
taught by William Delvin. The first r.chool-house was built on 
the south side of Market street, on a lot three lots west of the 
American House, and school was kept in the house in the win- 
ter of 1835 '^'^^ 1836. Tlie teacher's name was McClure. The 
house w'as also used as a Court House. 

The first Church was built by the Roman Catholic denomina- 
tion on out-lot No. I. Other denominations organized in the 
following order: Baptist, Methodist, Presbyterian, Lutheran, 
Christian, German Reformed and United Brethren. The lead- 
ing denomination is the Roman Catholic. 

The only town in the township is the City of Huntington. 
The original proprietor was Gen. John Tipton, of Logansi)ort. 
The original lots were sold by Capt. Elias Murray, the attorney 
of Gen. Tipton. A more extended notice of the city will be 
given at a subsetpient page. 



— Historical Sketch of 



UNION TOWNSHIP. 

Union Township was first organized at the September term, 
1842, of the Board of County Commissioners, and named 
" Monroe Township." At the June term, 1845, the township 
was re-organized, and called Union ToAvnship. 

It was first settled in 1836, by John McEvven, who settled on 
section thirty-two. There were three persons in his family. 
John A. Freel and John Lewis settled in the township within 
the next year. 

The first house was built and the first log-j'olling took place 
on the farm of John McEwen. 

The first white child born in the township was John Barnes. 

The first death was that of Christian Wolf. 

Andrew Brandstrater, in 1847, built the first saw-mill. It was 
built on Flat Creek. There are three saw-mills now in operation 
in the township. 

Jacob Good kept the first school in the township, It was 
kept' on section thirty. 

The first school-house was built on section thirty-two. 

The first chui-ch was built in 1870, all denominations joining 
in its erection. The only other church building in the town-. 
shij) is the Allbright. 



Huntington County, Indiana. 21 



ROCKCREKK TOWNSHIP. 

Rockcreek Township was organized at the September term, 
1842, of the Board of County Commissioners. 

The first election was held at the house of George Poff. Wil- 
liam Clark was the Inspector. The ballot-box was a hat, and 

the whole number of votes cast was twei'oc. 
» 

The first settler was Albert Draper, a single man from Ver- 
mont, who came in 1832, and settled at the Indian Mills, on 
the Richardville Reserve. His nationality is American. 

Mr. J. Tracy came 1833, and Moses Sparks in 1834. 

Albert Draper still survives, and resides in Upper Alton, 
Illinois. He built the Indian Mills for the United Sta'tes for 
the use of the Miami Indians. This was the first house built in 
the Township. 

The first log-rolling was on the farm of Moses Sjjarks, in sec- 
tion twenty-four. 

Riley Draper, a son of .Mbert and Ra( hel Draper, was born in 
1836. He was the firtit white child born in the township, and 
the marriage of his parents, wliich occurred in 1S35, was the 
first marriage. 

The death of Mrs. .\dams in .\ugust, 1838, was the first death 
in the townshij). Eliza First, the wife of Israel First, died in 
the same month. 

The first saw-mill and flouring-mill were the Indian Mills, 
above referred to. There are in the township at the i)resent 
time ten saw-mills and three flouring-mills. 

The first school taught by Thomas O'Thigh, in 1839, on sec- 
tion three, on the farm now owned by Jonas Kelsey ; and the 
next year the first school-house was built on section thirty-one. 

The first church was built in 1861 by the Missionary Baptists 



2 2 Historical Sketch of 

at Markle. Other denominations built churches in the follow- 
ing order: Presbyterians, Disciples and Methodists. 

The town of Markle was laid out by J. Tracy, where he built 
a house in 1833, and kept a grocery store in the woods three 
miles from the nearest settler. It has a population of about 300. 

At the first election Albert Draper was elected Justice of the 
Peace, John Sheets, Jacob F. Sours and N. Poison were elected 
Township Trustees, and William Clark was elected Township 
Clerk. 

The Township was first divided into School Districts in 1842. 



LANCASTER TOWNSHIP. 

Lancaster Township was organized on the 15th day of May, 
1837. Its territory was reduced by the organization of Rock- 
creek Township in September, 1842, and was again reduced, and 
to its present limits, by the organization of Polk Township in 
March, 1846. 

The township was first settled in May, 1834, by Joseph 
Sprowl, who, with his family, consisting of ten persons, moved 
from Preble county, Ohio, and settled on section thirty-four. 
His nationality was American. 

Joseph P. Anthony and Abram Nordyke came in February, 
1835, and Solomon Shideler with his family, consisting of five 
persons, came in the fall of the same years. Joseph P. Anthony, 
Jacob Shideler, and James, Mary Ann, Elizabeth, Robert, W. 
M. and Davidson Sprowl still survive. 

The first road district embraced Lancaster, Jefferson and 
Wayne Townships, and Abram Nordyke was the first Supervisor. 



Huntington Connty, Indiana. 23 

Tlie first house was built and tlie first log-rolling occurred on 
Joseph Sprowl's farm, in section thirty-four. 

The first marriage in the townshij) was solemnized in Novem- 
ber, 1837, Charles Morgan and Elizabeth Fisher being the 
contracting parties. 

The first death was that of Mrs. ^Volgarmoth, whicii occurred 
in April, 1837. 

William Markes built the first saw-mill. It was built on 
Richland Creek, on section thirty-one, in 1843. ''^t; first 
flouring-mill was built in 183S, on the Salamony River, on 
section thirty, by Henry Hildebrand, Sr. At this time there 
are si.\ saw-mills and two flouring-mills in the townshij). 

The first school was kept in 1838, on the Charleston section, 
by Nancy Hildebrand. The first school-house wa.s built in 
18-J0, at Mt. Etna. 

The first church was built in 1840, at Mt. Etna, by the 
Methodist Episcopal denomination. Other denominations 
organized in the following order : Christians, German Baptists, 
Wesleyan Methodists, United Brethren, Lutherans, Disciples 
and Church of God. The leading denominations are the 
(ierman Baptist and Methodist Episcopal. 

John Hefner was the original proprietor of Mt. P>tna, a town 
of al)out 300 inhabitants. Solomon Shideler was the original 
proprietor of New Lancaster, a town of about 130 inhabitants, 
and James Crosby was the original pro]irietor of Kelso, a town 
of about 70 inhabitants. 



24 



Historical Sketch of 



POLK TOWNSHIP. 



Polk Township was organized at the March Term, 1846, of 
the Board of County Commissioners. It was first settled on the 
23d day of September, 1836, by Jacob Fisher, who, with his 
family, consisting of nine persons, moved from Clinton County, 
Ohio, and located on the northwest quarter of section twenty- 
four. He is a native of North Carolina. 

Within the next year, Nathan Fisher, Willis Jeffrey, John 
Campbell, Leonard Parrott, Greenbury Martin, Daniel James 
and Daniel Webb settled in the township. All these pioneers 
still survive except Leonard Parrott. 

The first house was built and the first log-rolling occurred on 
Willis Jeffrey's farm. 

Silas B. Fisher, a son of Nathan and Elizabeth Fisher, who 
was born on the nth day of December, 1836, was the first 
white child born in the township. 

The first marriage took place in 1838, Charles Morgan and 
Elizabeth Fisher being the parties. 

On the 3d day of November, 1842, Susannah Fisher died. 
She was a daughter of Jacob Fisher. This was the first death in 
the township. 

The first saw-mill was built in the Spring of 1837, on Little 
Majenica, by Jol>n Campbell. He attached a "corn cracker" 
to the saw-mill. There are five saw-mills in operation at the 
l^resent time. The first flouring-mill was built on the Salamonie 
River by Henry Hildebrand, Sr. 

The first school was kept in a log cabin on the northeast 
corner of section twenty-five by Dr. Anderson. The first 
school-house was built in 1838, on the northeast corner of the 
northwest (piarter of section twenty-five. 



Hniiliii^ton County, Indiana. 25 

'I'hc first churcli was built in 1856, on the school section. h\- 
the W'csleyan Methodists. 'The Cihristians built the next 
church. The leading denomination is the Methodist Kpisio]jal. 

In the sjjring of 1874, Jacob Leedy and John Pikher laid out 
the town of Monument City — so called because of a ver\- elegant 
marble monument erected at tliat point bv the |)eoijle of the 
townshi[) in memory of the .soldiers who entered the army in the 
late war ft-om the township, who were killed or died of disease 
during the term of their enlistment. 



WAVNK T(J\VNSH1P. 

Wayne Township was organized at the June term, 1844, of 
the Board of County Commissioners. Tiie name was suggested 
by 'I'liomas Fisher, in honor of Wayne Count\, Indiana. 

The first election was held at the house of Josei)h Weavers. 
Henry Kline was tlie Inspector. 

The township was first settled on the 8th dav of March, 1835, 
by J<»hn Ruggles and liis familv, consisting of six persons, and 
John IJuzzard and his family, consisting of nine persons. They 
moved from Ohio together. Jolin Ruggles .settled on the 
northeast cpiarter of section thirteen, and John Buzzard settled 
on the southeau (juarter of section twelve. Their nationality 
was .American. "Within the next year, Anderson Leverton, 
Asher Fisher, Thomas l''isher, Tliomas Hollowed and Jaccjb 
S.iider settled in tlie township. John Ruggles, .Vsher Fisher 
anil Thoma.-; l-"isher still snr\ ive. 

The first house was built and the first log-rolling occurred on 
John Ruggles' fLirm. « 



26 Hisforical Skcfih of 

The first white child born in the township was Wesley 
Buzzard, who was born on the 15th day of April, 1835. He 
was a son of John and Rachel Buzzard. 

In 1837, Oliver W. Sanger married Catherine A. Snider. 
This Avas the first marriage in the township. 

The first death was that of Ary Cecil, which occurred on the 
8th day of April, 1839. 

'I'he first saw-mill was built b)' John Sparks. There are two 
saw-mills in operation in the township. 

I'he first school was taught in John Buzzard's cal>in b\- Nancy 
Hildebrand. The first school-house was built in 1839, on 
.section twelve. 

The first church \vas built b\ the Baptists in i860, on section 
thirty-four. The leading denomination is the Baptist. 



JEFFERSON TOWNSHIP. 

Jefferson Township Mas organized at the March term, 1S43. 
of the Board of County Commissioners. The first election was 
held at the house of William Purviance, of which election he 
was Inspector, 

The township was first settled Ii)' (leorge W, Helms in 
February, 1834, who, with his family, consisting of four persons, 
moved from Preble Count)', Ohio, and located ow section 
twehe. His nationality was American. l\*ter Wire, with his 
family, consisting of four persons, mo\ed into the township in 
October, 1834. Of these pioneers, Peter Wire, Newton Wire 
and M. F. Wire still survi\*e. 



Huntington County, Iniliana. 27 

The first house was built by (Icorgc W. Helms on section 
twelve. The first log-r(;lling took i)la(e on Peter Wire's farm. 

I'he first white rhild Ixjrn in the townshij) was Lavina Wire. 
She was the daughter of I'eter and .Xanc y \Vire, and was born 
on the 4th day of March, 1836. 

In 1839, l-rederick Hefner married Nancy Cook. 'Iliis was 
the first marriage in the township. 

The first death was that of .Mr. Stewart, which occurred in 
August, 1838. 

In 1839 or 1840, Aaron Bond and John Hefner built the first 
saw-mill. It was built on Richland Creek, on section si.\. .\t 
the same time and j)lace the same |)ersons built the first flouring- 
niill. .Vt this time there are two .saw-mills and (->ne flouring-mill 
in the township. 

In 1838 the first school-house was built. It was erected on 
section three. The first school was taught during the same year 
in the " nev." school-house" by David C. Little. 

The first church was built in 1870 by the Christians, in section 
nine, and is known as Piirviance Cha))el. The Methodist 
Epi.scopal, L'nited lircthren and Friends also have organizations 
in the townshi]). 

Samuel K. Satterthwaite is the proprietor of the town of 
Pleasant Plain, a village of about fortv inhabitants. 



Historical Sketch of 



SALAMONY TOWNSHIP. 

Salamony Township was organized on the 24th da}- of Fel)- 
ruarv, 1835. ^'^^ original territorial extent was six miles wide, 
north and south, and sixteen miles east and west. It was the 
first division of the present limits of the county into townships. 

An election for the choice of a Justice of the Peace was held 
on the 6th day of April, 1S35. Samuel Jones Avas appointed 
Inspector of the election. 

The township was reduced to its present limits at tlie March 
term, 1843, ^^ ^^^^* Board of County Commissioners. 

The first settlement was made on the 27th day of September, 
1833, by Samuel Jones, a soldier in the war of 181 2. He 
settled on the present site of the town of Warren. He, with 
his family, consisting of eight persoiis, moved from Highland 
County, Ohio. His nationalit\- was American. Within the 
next year Fleming Mitchell, Lewis Richards, James Morrison. 
Leander Morrison, Andrew Beard, Noah McCrew, Ezra C. 
Thompson (who was one of the garrison of Fort Nisbit, Ohio), 
John McOrew, L. W. Purviance, Ezekiel Fleming. David Wire 
(a survivor of Sinclair's defeat) and Michael Revael settled 
within the present limits of the township. Of all this goodly 
company of pioneers, Mrs. vSamuel Jones, Fleming Mitchell. 
Leander Morrison, Andrew Beard and John McOrew alone 
survi\e. 

The first house was built b\' Samuel Jones, and the first log- 
rolling occurred on the present site of the town of Warren. 

Mary Jane McCirew, a daughter of Noah and Elizabeth 
McCirew, was tlie first white child born in the tcTwnslii]). She 
was born on the 5th da\- of Ai)ril, 1834. 



Hiiiiti)ii:;toii Coil II t\, III (/id 11(1. 29 

TIk- first nuirria^e was that of I.candcr Morrison and Matilda 
Jones, which o(( urrcd on the 26th (hw of Kebrnary, 1S35. 

Michael Revael died on the 20th of Janiiarv, 1S35. This 
was the first death in the townshiji. 

Fleming Mitchell hiiilt the first saw-mill about one mile above 
Warren. He also built the first tlourini^-mill in 1X35. Bolting 
was attached in 1837 b\' John Reid. who < ame from Massa- 
<husetts. At this time there are two saw-mills and three 
nouring-mills in operation in the townshi]). 

The first school was taught one mile below Warren bv John 
McCirew, and the first school-house was built near the Mounds, 
south of Warren. 

The first church was built in the towii of \Varren b\- the 
Reformed Fresbvterians. Other denominations followed in the 
following order: liaptist, Met'iodist. Iniversalist, Christian 
and L'nited brethren. The leading denomination is the 
Methodist I'][jiscopal. 

The town of Warren is the onh' town in the townshiji. It 
lias a populatioii of about 450. 



30 Histoiical Sketch of 



THE CITY OF HUNTINGTON. 

The town of Huntington was intorporated on the i6th clay 
of February, 1848. Its population in 1850 was 594; in i860 it 
was 1,664; in 1870 it was 2,925, and at the present time it is 
about 4,500. 'J'he town organized as a city on the 17th day of 
September, 1873. 

The value of lots and improvements, as returned for taxation, 
is ;!g677,54o. The value of personal property, as returned for 
taxation, is :^436,525 ; making a total of $1,113,865. The 
a:tuil \x\\\t of the real and personal property of the eity is not 
far from $2,500,000, making the average wealth of the popula- 
tion about $500 for each of its 4,500 people. 

It ha; eight churches, all sui)porting regular pastors. 

Its public schools have reached a very high degree of excel- 
lence, and are justly the pride of its citizens. The present 
organization of the ijublic schools has been in operation three 
vears, with the most satisfactory results. The jjtiblic school- 
house and grounds are substantial and elegant, and compare 
Vv-^ry favorably with anv in tlic State. The school revenue of the 
City Schools for tuition for the year ending June i6th, 1876, 
amounted to $5,262.99, and for the Special Fund it amounted 
to $6,300.85. During the last \ear the school was in session' 
200 days. There were 1,267 ^< b"(^I children in the city limits, 
an<l 579 were enrolled in the City .Schools. The average 
attendance was 456. The cost of each j^upil for the year was 
$11.40 — a little more than live cents per day. The course ot 
instruction, running through eleven years, is (piite extensive, 
\erv fully i)re])aring puj^ils to enter the highest colleges of the 
land, as well as to discharge the business and enjoy the delights 



Huntington County, Iniliana. 31 

of tlie intellectual jnirsuits of lite. The ^cIkjoIs are under the 
direction of Prof. Janies Haldu'in. who has i»een Suj)erinten<lent 
for three yeans, assisted by a cor)>s of nine teachers. 'l"he fol- 
lowing articles were jjrepared for and sent t(» the Centennial 
J'".x[)osition at Hiiil idelphia ; A geological cabinet, containing 
nearly four hundred specimens in niineralog\- and geologv, 
collected and arranged princii)ally by the pupils of (irade 1), 
Miss K. A. Collins, teacher; a collection of the native woods of 
Huntington County (fifty-seven s])eciniens '. the work of the 
High .Srhool, Herman Heinrich>. teacher ; a volume cf majis 
and ]>en drawing-;, executed by grades I), C and H, Mrs. M. A. 
McCaslin, Miss Alma Holman, Mi.ss Kate Hunt and Miss \\. \. 
Collins the teachers, res[>ectivel\' ; four volumes of e.xamination 
])apers ( ]>repared at the regular monthly examination in Decem- 
l)er), copies of re]>oits, blanks, course of studv, i\:( . This 
tlisplay attracted the attention and admiration of the public in 
that vast disjilay of the achievements of the world. William 
McCirew, William Kwing ai^.d .Vkxar.der W. Del. org .ire tl.e 
'J'rustees. 

In addition to the ))ublic scliools, the (lernian Reformed 
Church, the Lutheran C'hurch and the Catholic Church each 
supports a school. Ihe number enrolled in the Cierman 
Reformed School is 50; the average attendance is 45. During 
the last vear the school was in session 190 da\s. The school is 
taught in the I'Jiglish and Cerman language, and its course of 
instru( tion is substantially that of a t ommon Knglish education, 
i'he tuition per |)Upil is fit'tv tents per month. The \ahie of the 
school property is about $t^,ooo. The Re\. 1'. H. l)ip])le, the 
pastor of the church, is the teacher. 

The number enrolled in the Lutheran School is 70 ; the 
average attendance is 60. During the last \ear the schotd was 
in session 120 days. 'I'he school is taught in the Cerman lan- 
guage, and its course of instruction is substantially that of a 



32 Historical Skctcli of 

common Knglish education. The Rev. A. Steger,^ the pastor of 
the church, is the teacher. 

The number enrolled in the Catholic School is 235 ; the 
average attendance is 213. During the past year the school was 
in session 210 days. The expenses of the school aggregate 
$1,200 per annum, which is provided by the members of the 
<;hurch, making an average of about $5.70 per pupil. The 
school-house is an elegant building, three stories high, erected 
by members of the church, at a cost of $18,000. The advanced 
boys' classes are taught by John McCarthy ; the other classes are 
taught by four "Sisters of Notre Dame." The course 01" 
instruction prepares pupils to enter college. 

The most prominent manufacturing estal)lishments are Briant 
& Taylor's Stave Factory, oi>erating 75 hands; Taylor &: Crif- 
fith's Plow-hantlle Factory, operating 30 hands ; Drover's Spoke 
Factory, operationg 25 hands ; Moffitt & Roche's Foundry and 
Machine Shop, operating 15 hands; Niblock's Flax, Tow and 
Bagging Factory, operating 30 hands ; Townsend cS: Kenower's 
Lumber and Planing MiH, oj^eratingyg hands; Thorne, Slack 
& Ayres' Planing Mill, oi)erating i4rhinds; A. Q. Kenower's 
Cabinet Factory, operating 12 hands; Hall & Hendrix's Car- 
riage Factory, operating 9 hands ; F. Kopp's Cabinet Factory, 
op-^rating 7 hands ; 6 Boot and Shoe Establishments, operating 
35 hands; 4 Tailoring Establishments, operating 22 hands; S. 
T. Morgan's Chair-stuff Mill, operating 6 hands ; Huntington 
ManuRicturing Co., Irregular Wood Stuff, operating 4 hands; 
2 Newspaper Offices, oi)erating 8 hands ; 2 large Flouring Mills 
are in oi)eration for merchant and ( ustom work. There are 
many other establishm;;nts, giving constant employment to a 
large numl)er of artizans. The mercantile portion of the 
comn-iunity is large, rei^resenting every department of trade. 
'i"he trade of the city is cpiite extensive, embracing, as it does in 
many tlepartments, a territory of more than 400 sc]uare miles, 



Huntington County, Indiana. 33 

and a population of more than 30,000. The Lime interest, 
which is very kirge and very important, has been referred to on 
another page. In short, Huntington isone of the most thriving 
and prosj^erous cities in the \Val>a.sli Valley. 



AGRICULTURAL SOCIETY. 

The first Agricultural Fair was held in the Old Court House, 
on the north-west corner of Jefferson and Franklin .streets, in 
Huntington, in the fall of 1852, under the direction of John 
Becker, Albert Draper, Robert F\son, Sr. , James B. Custance, 
Jacob Snyder and others; l)ut without defiiite organization. 
The articles on exhibition were principally Fruit, Vegetable; and 
Needle Work. 

On the 15th of December, 1852, a call was issued and publish- 
ed in the "Indiana Herald" for a meeting to be held on the 
first day of January, 1S53, for the ])urpose of organizing an Ag- 
ricultural Society. The call was signed by Wm. (i. Sutton, I). 
Oarlick anil Warren Hecox, On the first tlay of January, 1853, 
a meeting was held with Jacob Snyder as Chairman, L. 1*. Mil- 
ligan, Secretary, and Wm. (L Sutton, Treasurer, f'ro tern. .Af- 
ter discussion of the subject, it was determined to permanently 
organize a Society, and the 5th day of February, 1853, was fixed 
for the election of Officers, at which time Charles H. Lewis was 
chosen President ; Warren Hecox, Vice-President; Wm. Norton, 
Secretary ; Wm. (L Sutton, Treasurer, and Albert Draper, James 
Purviance, Sexton Ivmley, Edward Coles, Thomas Moore, Jacob 
Snyder, David Chambers, James Miller, 'Thomas Fisher, Peter 
Weese, V.. Flemming and Robert Fyson, Sr., Directors. 

£ 



34 Historical Sketch of 

On the 7th of August, following, Charles H. Lewis resigned 
his office of President, and Warren Hecox became President. 
James Purviance, Robert Fyson, Sr., and Albert Draper prepar- 
ed and submitted a list of Premiums, offering in the aggregate 
the sum of $99.75, which list was adopted by the Society- 

The Society held its first Fair on the i8th and 19th days of 
October, 1853, on the south side of Little River, just below the 
old bridge, about where the residence of Samuel Buchanan now 
stands. The Fair was a success financially, its account shoAving 
$ I So. 60 of receipts, and the expenditures, being for premiums, 
1:67.75, miscellaneous $26.48, total $94.12, leaving a balance 
of $86.48 on hand. 

On the 4th of February, 1854, John Becker was elected Presi- 
dent, Robert Fyson, Sr., Vice-President, Wm. G. Sutton, Treas- 
urer, and S. AV. Hawley, Secretary. A Fair was held on the 
17th and 1 8th days of October, of that year, in the eastern part 
of Huntington, in what is known as Orrin Brown's meadow. 

On the i6th and 17th days of October, 1855, the Society held 
a Fair on the south side of Little River, just east of what Avas 
then known as Bratton's Grove. James M. Bratton was Presi- 
dent and A. W. DeLong was Secretary. After this Fair the or- 
ganization was abandoned. 

A meeting was held on the 2Sth day of P"ebruar\-, 1857, at 
which it was determined to re-organize the Society, and on the 
7th of April following a temporary organization A\as effected, 
with Peter Weese, President ; L. P. Milligan, Vice-President; A. 
M. Lewis, Secretary, and Wm. L. Steele, Treasurer. 

.A. permanent organization was completed on the 6th of June, 
with the same Officers as above set out, except for Treasurer, to 
which office John Roche was elected, and the following Direct- 
ors : James Leverton, Jacob Stults, John B.ecker, Robert Fyson, 
Sr., Peter Keefer, Thomas Fisher, Wm. B. Morgan, Thomas 



Hiintingion Coiiiifw I/nf/aiia. 35 

Moore, John Miller, Josei)h Miller and Lewis \V. Purviance. 
No Fair was held this year. 

Oil the 12th day of August, 1858, Jacob Stults was electe<l 
President; John Becker, Vice-President; A. M. Lewis, Secretary, 
and VVm. (1. Sutton, Treasurer. .\t the same meeting a thor- 
ough canvass of the county, by a number of speakers and a com- 
pany of singers, under the direction of Wm. L. Steele, was deter- 
mined upon. (Grounds just west of Huntington, on the north 
side and adjoining the Canal, had been secured by the Society, 
and a Fair was held on the 36th, jytli and 2<Sth days of October, 
1858. The Fair was a su( cess. ^dC\^i\ "^^ 

On the 4th day of June, 1859, L. V. Milligan was elected 
President; Elijah Snowden, Vice-President; A. M. Lewis, 
Secretary, and Wm. G. Sutton, Treasurer. 

The Society held its Fair this ye!ir on its grounds on the 28th, 
29th and 30th days of September. 

During the year i860 Wm. Oden was President and Joseph 
Chesebro, Vice-President, A. NL Lewis, Secretary, and Jacob 
Snyder, Treasurer. 

The Society held its Fair this year on its grounds on the, 3d, 
4th and 5th days of October. 

The officers for 1861 were Dr. H. S. Heatli, President ; Rob- 
ert Fyson, Sr., Vice-President ; .\. M. Lewis, Secretary, and 
Wm. Stults, Treasurer, and the Fair was held on the 25th, 26th 
and 27th days of September. 

Dr. H. S. Heath was President in 1862; Silas Jones, Vice- 
President; A. M. Lewis, Secretary, and John Roche, Treasurer. 

In December, 1863, Dr. H. S. Heath was elected President; 
L. P. Milligan, Vice-President; A. NL Lewis, Secretary, and 
Tipton AUman, Treasurer. 

The Society struggled along imtil tlie 14th day of January, 
1865, when the organization was abandoned. No Fairs had 
been held subsetpient to 1861. 



36 Hisfo7-iciil Sketch of 

On the 4th day of January, 1868, a meeting was held at the 
Court House, in Huntington, to reorganize the Society, and 
Peter VV. Zent was elected President ; O. W. Sanger, Vice- 
President ; John Roche, Treasurer, and Robert Simonton, 
Secretary. 

The present grounds of the Society were secured and a Fair 
held in 1869, the same persons being the officers of the Society, 
they having been elected for this year. 

The Society has held its Fairs regularly every year since that 
time. 

The following were the officers of the Society from 1870 to 
the present : 

, For 1870 — President, Peter W. Zent ; Vice-President, Frank 
McKeever ; Treasurer, Daniel Kitch ; Secretary, Robert 
Simonton. 
For 1871 — President, P. W. Zent ; Vice-President, Robert 
Fyson, Sr. ; Treasurer, Daniel Kitch ; Secretary, Robert 
Simonton. 
For 1872 — President, John D. Jones; Vice-President, H. F. 
Billiter; Treasurer, Daniel Kitch; Secretary, Robert 
Simonton. 
For 1873 — President, P. W. Zent; Vice-President, Frank 
McKeever ; Treasurer, Daniel Kitch ; Secretary, Alfred 
Moore. 
For 1874 — President, P. W. Zent ; Vice-Presid't, Peter Weese ; 

Treasurer, Daniel Kitch ; Secretary, Alfred Moore. 
For 1875 — President, Luther Cummings ; Vice-President, 
Frank McKeever ; Treasurer, Daniel Kitch ; Secretary, 
Robert Simonton. 
For 1876 — President, Frank McKeever; Vice-President, 
Jacob Stults ; Treasurer, Daniel Kitch; Secretary, Robt. 
Simonton, who afterwards resigned and T. L. Lucas was 
elected his successor. 



Huntington County, Iniiana. 37 

For 1S77 — President, Frank McKeever ; Vice-President, Jacob 
Stults ; Treasurer, Peter Weese ; Secretary, Willis A. 
Jones. 

The success of the Society has been very gratifying to its 
friends, and its influence in develoj^ing the resources of the 
County has been and is very marked. From the small begin- 
ning, noted above, it has grown to be a powerful corporation, 
involving in its transactions large and influential interests. 
Particular attention has been given to the improvement of hogs, 
and the result is that Huntington County is producing hogs, 
probably, superior in quality to those produced in any other 
locality in the United States. Like results would doubtless 
follow any other special effort of the Society. Its continued 
prosperity is of public importance. 



38 Historical Sketch of 



HUNTINGTON COUNTY. 

Huntington county was covered by a native forest equal to 
any, in this latitude, on the continent. ItsJiard woods are of a 
long, tough fibre, making them exceedingly valuable for all kinds 
of manufacture, and jjarticularly so for bent work and ship build- 
ing. They have, from an early date in the history of the coun- 
ty, been a very large element in its progress, prosperity and sub- 
stantial wealth. The saw-mill is met with in every quarter. At 
this time there are sixty saw-mills in operation. 

The county is admirably supj^lied with water. The Salamonic, 
Wabash and Little River are the principal streams. There is no 
considerable portion of the county that is not drained and sujj- 
plied by living streams. Fine cjualities of lime and building 
stone are found along the principal water courses. The lime 
produced from the (juarries at Huntington is justly celebrated 
throughout a very extensive region of the central northwest. It 
underlies about six square miles of territory, and is practically 
inexhaustible. It is exceedingly accessible. At no point is it 
more than two feet until a merchantable cjuality of stone is 
reached. It has been sustaining a very considerable population, 
engaged in its manufacture, for several years. Its develojjment 
is being prosecuted with vigor and very satisfactory results. 

A superior quality of building stone is found at Markle, on 
the east line of the county; on Little River, near Huntington, 
and at Antioch, near the west line of the county. 

The soil is adapted to the vigorous i)roduction of all the 
grains, seeds, grasses, ' vegetables and fruit indigenous in this 
latitude. 



Hii/ih'ng/on Coiiiih\ Indiana. 



39 



The ronstriiction of the \\'al)ash and Krie Canal to Huntington, 
in the summer of 1835, lirougln in a large numhcr of speeula- 
tors, why bought extensive trai ts and hehl them on speculation. 
For many years this was a serious obstacle to the settlement and 
development of the county. The first canal-boat arrived at 
Huntington in the evening of the 3d day of Jul)-, 1835. 

The next public improvement was the < onstruction of the 
plank road from Huntington to Liberty Mills, on Kel River, a 
distance of sixteen miles, whicji was comjjleted in the summer 
of 1S53. It was an exceedingly valuable im])rovcment to the 
country along its route. It has, however, been alxindoned. 

The Toledo, Wabash and Western Railroad was completed to 
Huntington in the fall of 1855, the first locomotive arriving on 
Thursday evening, November 13th. 

In 1S56 a plank road was completed from Huntington to 
Warren, on the Salamonie River, which was vastly valuable to 
the country through which it ])assed. It has been re-j^laced, for 
the greater part of its course, by a gravel road, constructed two 
years ago. 

Crravel roads are being constructed from Huntington to Mt. 
Ktna, on the .Salamonie River, a distance of ten miles ; from 
Huntington to Lancaster, on the Salamonie Ri\er, a distance of 
ten miles; and from Antioch to Monument C'itw a distance of 
six miles. Other roads of a like character are being contem- 
plated in various parts of the county. 

The population of the county in 1840 was 1,579*. in 1850 it 
was 7,850 ; in i860 it was 14,867 ; in 1S70 it was 19,036, and 
at the present time it is not far from 25,000. 

The area of improved lands was as follows: In 1836. 1.465 
acres; in 1850, 26,703 acres; in i860, 62,394 acres, and in 
1870, 105,453 acres. 

The value of lands and improvements and town lots in 1836 
was $26,450 ; in 1850,5908,669; in i860, i?3, 405, 861, and in 



40 Historical Sketch of 

1870, $7,573,192. The value of agricultural implements and 
machinery in 1850 was $48,013; in i860, $104,255, and in 
1870, $219,095. 

The number of horses in 1850 was 1,967 ; in i860, 3,913 ; in 
1870, 5,902, and in 1876, 7,070. 

The number of cattle in 1850 was 4,769; in i860, 9,350; in 
1870, 10,676, and in 1876, 15,542. 

The number of sheep in 1850 was 4,316; in i860, 12,237; 
in 1870, 21,058, and in 1876, 16,013. 

The number of hogs in 1850 was 11,289; '•"' i860, 25,137, 
and in 1870, 20,565. 

The value of live stock in 1850 was $42,611; in i860, 
$443,867, and in 1870, $832,861. 

The value of slaughtered animals in 1850 was $30,147; in 
i860, $68,953, ^'"'*^^ •'"' 1870, $219,508. 

The following is the number of bushels of wheat, corn and 
potatoes produced in the years given : 

1850. i860. 1870. 1875. 

Wheat .... 76,750 167,225 367^521 318,823 

Corn 216,173 539'56i 288,840 1,124,498 

Potatoes . . . 19,757 6,417 42,655 60,195 

Total value of taxables as returned for taxation in 1S40 was 
$109,049, and in 1875, $7>5o4,47o- 

The number of churches in 1850 was 6; accommodations, 
2,200; value of property, $2,300, In i860 the number was 24; 
accommodations, 7,850 ; value of property, $18,450, and in 
1870 the number was 27; accommodations, 9,750; value of 
property, $130,500. 

The whole number of school children enumerated is 7,479. 
There are 116 schools and 124 teachers in the county. The 
number of students enrolled in the public schools is 4,800. 
This does not include the parochial, or other than the common 
schools of the county, in which about 400 are enrolled. The 
total revenue for tuition for the last year was $25,934.46, making 



Huntington County, Indiana. 41 

the average cost of each pupil about $5.40. Teacliers are paid 

from $1.70 to ;^2.io per (hi\-. During tiie hist year the schools 

were in ses.-^ijn 101 (hiys. The vahie of school property is 

$107,600. 

The folk)wing is an exhibit of the manufacturing interests : 

i860. 1870. 

Number of establishments 57 166 

Capital invested $160,550 $451,710 

Number of persons em[)l()\ed. . . . 181 653 

.\nnual cost of labor $5 3? 59 2 $132,283 

.Annual cost of material $215,613 $453,941 

Annual \alue of jjroducts $350)^5<'^ 5813,255 

In 1870 there were iS water-wlieels, i)ropelling 286 horse- 
power, and 51 steam engines, propelling 1,271 horse-power, 
making 1,557 horse-power in machinery in the county. There 
are fifteen flouring-mills in oi)erati(!n in tlie ( ount)-. 

Many (Jtiier statistics are at hand to ^how the development of 
the resources of the county. These, however, are tiiought to be 
suffic;ient to give a good practical knowledge of the subject. 

Pauperism and crime have ahva\s been at a very low percent. 
of the po])uIati<)n. (General intelligence ami moralitv have 
alwa\'s characterized the p^o])le of the count}-. 

The populatit)n is composed of emigrants from manv of the 
States of the Union and several countries of Euroj)e, who have 
become identified with each other in all the elements of peace, 
happiness and prosperity, and now presents a homogeneous mass 
of people who will do good to the stranger and emigrant in 
their midst.